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Herndon High School Fiddler on the Roof

By • Nov 16th, 2010 • Category: Cappies

Tzeitzel’s in love with a poor man; all Hodel wants is to be with a revolutionary; and Chava’s desperate to marry a man outside her faith — all against their father Tevye’s wishes. And to think you worried about your father approving of your boyfriend! With this all in mind, Herndon High School’s production of Fiddler on the Roof was well-received and entertaining.

Based on the 1894 novel “Tevye and his Daughters,” also known as “Tevye the Milkman,” the musical centers on the father of five daughters and his escapades with his own religious beliefs along with the influences surrounding his family. Fiddler on the Roof opened in 1964 on the Broadway stage and ran over 3,000 performances, making it one of Broadway’s longest running shows before being adapted into the well known 1971 movie by the same name.

The theme of “traditions” was carried throughout the show with consistent energy and dedication as seen with the lively show opener “Tradition,” showcasing the town’s villagers and Tevye’s family while setting the focused tone of the show. Throughout Fiddler on the Roof, all characters and ensemble demonstrated a clear, consistent, and pleasing vocal blend as seen with many numerous company numbers. Musical numbers typically featured a fantastic use of stage space as well.

As Tevye, Andy Raoufi gave a solid performance that showed a true grasp of his character, creating a likable interpretation that was well-rounded throughout with his vocals, emotional dynamics, and comedic lines; his monologues to God often resulted in chuckles and laughter with well-delivered lines and good humor. Hodel (Christine Bobby) also performed with firm understanding as the oldest daughter, with smooth vocal control and consistency with her vibrato and high notes that were highlighted in “Far From the Home I Love.”

Emma Miller-Cvilikas was a delight with a mix of a relentless nature and surprising sweetness as Yente, the town’s hounding matchmaker. With a wobbly walk, snorts for laughter, and the occasional knee slap, she gave an excellent performance with vigor and many laughs during the course of the show. The musical number entitled “The Dream” was also a particularly memorable performance as Tevye’s nightmare scene was explored with a devilish wife from the grave (Liz Peterson) and fantastic use of a scrim, red cyclorama lighting, and rotational sets.

In turn, the production of Fiddler on the Roof used a variety of technological effects in order to create a believable and convincing atmosphere for its characters to live in, with a simple yet warm set designed by Herndon High School’s Tech Theatre Class. The sound was well mastered by Justin Burns who controlled a large number of mics with precision and accuracy. Although set changes could be somewhat drawn out, the Herdon High School Pit Orchestra handled these changes with good timing and strong and solid playing. With music over the high school level, the orchestra gave a fantastic performance without overpowering the cast members.

In the village of Anatevka, “times are changing,” but Herndon High School’s production of Fiddler on the Roof showed “constant devotion,” keeping focus and energy throughout to give a heartwarming and delightful performance.

by Victoria Tovig of Langley High School

Photo Gallery

Andy Raoufi (Tevye) Andy Raoufi (Tevye) and Sarah Freeman (Chava)
Andy Raoufi (Tevye)
Andy Raoufi (Tevye) and Sarah Freeman (Chava)
Micala Fox (Golde) and Emma Miller-Cvilikas (Yente) Nick Lytle (Motel), Chris Hrozencik (Rabbi), Ashleigh Markin (Tzeitel)
Micala Fox (Golde) and Emma Miller-Cvilikas (Yente)
Nick Lytle (Motel), Chris Hrozencik (Rabbi), Ashleigh Markin (Tzeitel)

Photos by Melanie Miller-Cvilikas.

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