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Rockville Little Theatre Same Time, Next Year

By • Jun 30th, 2009 • Category: Reviews
Same Time, Next Year
Rockville Little Theatre
Gaithersburg Arts Barn, Gaithersburg, MD
$15 ($13 for Gaithersburg residents)
Through July 3rd
Reviewed June 28th, 2009

Same Time, Next Year is a play by Bernard Slade. Same Time, Next Year follows a married couple who are having an affair. The couple meets together at the same inn once a year for 25 years. Throughout the show we see them every 4 or 5 years as they learn more about their relationships with their spouses and each other.

This was a strong character driven show. George, played by Ken Kemp, matured throughout the evening. He began as shy, guilty, and awkward. Later he grew into a wise old man. George’s “other woman” was Doris played convincingly by Annette Kalicki. Her easy going manner balanced out George’s anxiety. Their emotional shifts as the show progressed were utterly believable.

The play spanned 25 years and therefore aging needed to take place to make the show believable. Hair and Makeup (Lauren Uberman) was used to add gray to George. Doris’s hairstyles changed, but the gray never did show. She did not seem to age as much. George though seemed to age too quickly, especially at the final scene. Doris on the other hand had a wrinkle line or two, but that was all. She did not seem to have aged as fast as George. The excellent costumes were coordinated by Florence Arnold.

The set, designed by David Levin with dressing by Anne Cary and Lauren Uberman, was gorgeous, the bedroom of an inn. One awkward placement was the sofa near the fireplace. It faced offstage, leaving several scenes where the actors were facing away most of the audience.

The pre-show, intermission, and blackout music samples were wonderfully chosen to show time in history moving forward during the shift. Edward Moser pulled from vintage television shows, music, and news reports to place the play into the historical timeline.

All in all, this two hour production of Same Time, Next Year was an enjoyable trip down memory lane watching a couple grow.

Director’s Notes

The Premise of Same Time, Next Year – 5-year snapshots of a couple over the course of 24 years – presents a major challenge for the actors. Not only must the characters age and mature, but they must convey the impact of social and historical events on the individual. We follow Doris and George through births, deaths, and career changes; from Adlai Stevenson to Goldwater with Esalen, sit-ins, CR groups and the tooth fairy thrown in for good measure. For some of us this is a trip down memory lane, for others a quick history lesson. But the timelessness of the two lovers’ enduring relationship keeps the play fresh and funny.

Photo Gallery

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Cast

  • Doris: Annette Kalicki
  • George: Ken Kemp

Crew

  • Producer: Anne Cary
  • Director: Anne Cary
  • Stage Manager: Barbara Hazelett
  • Assistant Director: Lauren Uberman
  • Set Design: David Levin
  • Master Carpenter: David Kaysen
  • Construction: Frank Adler, David Levin, Lauren Uberman
  • Painting: Fran Levin, Diane Pick
  • Set Dressing: Anne Cary, Laurne Uberman
  • Properties: Margie Henry
  • Lighting Design: Peter Caress
  • Lighting Execution: Alex Henry
  • Sound Design: Edward Moser
  • Music Recording: Ted Poulos
  • Pianist: Brandon Gage
  • Sound Execution: Jamie Linn
  • Costumes: Florence Arnold
  • Hair & Make-up: Lauren Uberman
  • Running Crew: Mary Louise Bishop, John McNamara, Alex Henry
  • Program Copy: Annette Kalicki
  • Publicity: Ken Kemp
  • Photographer: Dean Evangelista
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started ShowBizRadio in August 2005 because they love live theater. They each have both performed in and worked behind the scenes in DC area productions, as well as earned a Career Studies Certificate in Theater from Northern Virginia Community College. Mike & Laura are each members of the American Theatre Critics Association, and Mike is a member of the Online News Association.

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