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Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology On the Town

By • Apr 24th, 2007 • Category: Cappies

Frank Sinatra is post-war America, belting “New York, New York,” in the much-famed 1949 film version of On the Town. That same musical represents the all glitz and glamour the Big Apple had to offer, all the class – but at the same time appealing to the common man with its classic boy-meets-girl style plot.

On the Town follows three sailors on 24-hour leave in Manhattan. Gabey, the focus of the trio, immediately falls in love with a girl on a subway poster, and of course, chaos ensues. Right-hand man Ozzie womanizes, left-hand man Chip sightsees, and at the end of the day, everyone has been paired up with the exception of Gabey, who is stood up by his dream date.

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology‘s performance of On the Town excelled in its focus on the hustle and bustle of the big city. Constant, quick scene changes and snappy line delivery helped the cast push on into the night of the city that never sleeps – bar hopping, avoiding hilarious fiancĂ©es, and doing whatever it took to get Gabey his gal.

Kate Kirschner and Jeewon Kim had especially stand-out performances with their interpretations of Ivy Smith and Judge Pitkin W. Bridework (respectively). Kirschner’s fluid dance numbers and vocals caused the audience to interrupt with applause several times, and gave the audience a bit of insight as to how Gabey might have fallen for her. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Kim’s overwhelmingly annoying portrayal of Judge Pitkin left the audiences in stitches – audience members laughed whenever he appeared on stage before he could even deliver his lines.

The cast was not without depth, either. Smaller parts were taken with equal enthusiasm and quality, with Stephan DiFazio and Phil Arevalo entertaining the audience between scenes in a silent police chase.

At the end of the play, the three sailors had to leave their 24-hour loves and get back in the ship, three more sailors taking their place on shore. With a last, rousing repetition of “New York, New York,” the three men sailed on, leaving their women for what may be years, and leaving the audience in a standing ovation.

by Trevor Britvec of Edison.

This review was written by a Cappies high school critic. The Cappies were founded in 1999, for the purpose of celebrating high school theater arts and providing a learning opportunity for theater and journalism students. You can learn more at cappies.com.

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is a program which was founded in 1999, for the purpose of celebrating high school theater arts and providing a learning opportunity for theater and journalism students. You can learn more at cappies.com.

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